Watch My Latest Presentation: What Future Doctors Need to Know About ED

One of my greatest blessings is being able to use my story to help others. My hope is that my experience with ED can teach others about mental health, ED, treatment, prevention, and identification. My book and blog have been instrumental to this, as they allow anyone all over the world to learn about my journey. The interviews that I do are another way to advocate. And a few months ago, I was asked to give a presentation to medical students at McMaster university. (Note that this presentation occurred in November 2014, but I have only just now had a chance to post it!) The focus of this presentation was to share my journey and shed some light on EDs.

This was a wonderful opportunity. It strikes me how sparse education on EDs is in the healthcare field. In my presentation, I highlighted the signs and symptoms of ED, diagnosis information, treatment goals, and the process of supporting recovery. Although I have this presentation to future physicians, the information in it is also extremely valuable for all doctors, nurses, etc to know. It's also good information for anyone in general to be aware of.


I hope you enjoy this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9r8yiFVLxF4)! I received feedback from the medical students that this presentation was very helpful for all of them to have - some even told me it was more meaningful than other lectures on ED because it came from a survivor of ED and as a nurse...someone with personal experience with ED - as well as someone who is the healthcare field! It's a blessing to be able to use my journey not only to advocate, but also to educate others. This is proof that recovery is 100% possible. If you or anyone you know can benefit from the education in this video, please watch it and pass it on. Knowledge is power - learning about ED is the first step towards raising awareness, preventing ED, and supporting others.  I hope you enjoy it!

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